Monday, January 21, 2013

Informing

I have carried a concealed weapon for 25 years, as a resident of four states. I always thought that it would be prudent to inform officers that I came in contact with that I was carrying a concealed weapon. Until 2001, that is.
That was the year that I was pulled over by an Orange County Sheriff's Deputy Sergeant for running a stop sign. He told me to step out of the car, and I handed him my license, registration, and concealed weapons permit, and told him "Just so you don't get nervous, I want to let you know that I am carrying a concealed weapon." The conversation went like this:

Deputy Sergeant: (puts hand on gun) "You move and I will kill you where you stand. You wanna try me? I bet I'm faster."
DM "I was just letting you know, so that you wouldn't be nervous."
DS "Do I look nervous to you, boy?"
DM "No."
DS "I can't believe that they let dumb assholes like you carry a gun."
DM "What's your problem?"
DS "You are. Please, make one move, so I can have an excuse."

The rest of the conversation was just a productive. He didn't even arrest me or write a ticket. Ever since, I no longer inform them, especially since Florida doesn't have a duty to inform. It isn't worth the risk of running into the wrong cop.

3 comments:

Bob S. said...

Texas has a duty to inform but it has been defanged so to speak. Previously your license could be suspended for 6 months if you didn't inform.

Now it is still there but the suspension has been removed.

I've been lucky; the 3 times I've been stopped for speeding none of the cops have been jerks about it.

After reading your recall of the events, I can really see why some people carry recorders or cameras when interacting with the police.

Graybeard said...

I saw a video a few days ago from somewhere in Florida of a guy who was pulled over. While reaching back into the van for his wallet, he exposed his holstered gun and the officer went crazy on him. Had the guy face down on the ground, accusing the old guy of brandishing at him.

GreyLocke said...

I would be contacting the officer's superiors and filing a written complaint with the state attorney generals office for a deadly threat under the color of the law.

When I was in law enforcement in Missouri that was a charge that would sink even a fully post certified officers career. Granted it took 3-5 years to get their certification pulled, but it made local muni chiefs perk up their ears and actually listen to you.